July 28, 1989 in US cinemas: Touchstone Pictures releases “Turner and Hooch”

“The Oddest Couple Ever Unleashed!”

Turner & Hooch is a 1989 comedy drama crime film starring Tom Hanks and Beasley as the eponymous and occasionally maverick characters, Turner and Hooch respectively. The film also stars Mare Winningham, Craig T. Nelson, and Reginald VelJohnson. It was directed by Roger Spottiswoode; it was originally slated to be directed by Henry Winkler, but he was terminated due to “creative differences”. It was co-written by Michael Blodgett from Beyond the Valley of the Dolls fame.

Although K-9 (with James Belushi) was released prior to the film (exactly three months earlier), it became more popular and seemingly overshadowed its greater success probably down to the maverick nature of Hooch, even though K-9 had a very similar plot.

Find out more at disney.wikia.com.

July 28, 1951 in US and UK cinemas: Disney releases “Alice In Wonderland”

“It’s truly Wonderful!”

Alice in Wonderland is the thirteenth animated feature film produced by Walt Disney in the Disney Animated Canon and originally premiered in London, England on July 28, 1951 by Walt Disney Pictures. Lewis Carroll’s books Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass had only a few adaptations before this movie; this adaptation solved the problems of the setting by using animation (the next adaptation wouldn’t come until 1972, two decades later). The film features the voices of Kathryn Beaumont as Alice (also the voice of Wendy Darling in the later Disney feature film, Peter Pan) and Ed Wynn as the Mad Hatter. Made under the supervision of Walt Disney himself, this film and its animation are often regarded as some of the finest work in Disney studio history, despite the lacklustre, even hostile, reviews it originally received, especially in the UK. Even those that have made the film, including Walt Disney himself, didn’t like the film, though it did receive an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Score.

Find out more at disney.wikia.com.

July 27, 1984 in UK cinemas: Star Trek III – The Search For Spock

“A Dying Planet. A Fight For Life. The Search For Spock.

“USS Enterprise, captain’s personal log. With most of our battle damage repaired we are almost home. Yet I feel uneasy, and I wonder why… Perhaps it’s the emptiness of this vessel. Most of our trainee crew have been reassigned; Lieutenant Saavik and my son, David, are exploring the Genesis planet, which he helped create; and Enterprise feels like a house with all the children gone. No… more empty even than that. The death of Spock is like an open wound. It seems I have left the noblest part of myself back there on that newborn planet.”

STIII-Kruge

Admiral James T. Kirk, finding out he made a mistake by leaving Spock on the Genesis planet, must disobey orders and hijack the hobbled Enterprise to retrieve his best friend. However, a rogue Klingon seeking the secrets of the “Genesis torpedo” puts Kirk’s mission – as well as the Enterprise, its crew, and Spock himself – in jeopardy. [memory-alpha.wikia.com]

STIII-TSFSStar Trek III: The Search for Spock is an American science fiction film directed by Leonard Nimoy and based on the television series of the same name created by Gene Roddenberry. It is the third film in the Star Trek film series, and is the second part of a three-film story arc that begins with Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982) and concludes with Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986). After the death of Spock (Nimoy), the crew of the USS Enterprise returns to Earth. When James T. Kirk (William Shatner) learns that Spock’s spirit, or katra, is held in the mind of Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy (DeForest Kelley), Kirk and company steal the Enterprise to return Spock’s body to his home planet. The crew must also contend with hostile Klingons led by Kruge (Christopher Lloyd) who are bent on stealing the secrets of a powerful terraforming device.

STIII-Destruct

Paramount Pictures commissioned the film after the positive critical and commercial reaction to The Wrath of Khan. Nimoy directed the film, becoming the first Star Trek cast member to do so. Producer Harve Bennett wrote the script starting from the end and working back, and intended the destruction of the Enterprise to be a shocking development. Bennett and Nimoy collaborated with effects house Industrial Light & Magic to develop storyboards and new ship designs; ILM also handled the film’s many special effects sequences. Aside from a single day of location shooting, all of the film’s scenes were shot on Paramount and ILM soundstages. Composer James Horner returned to expand his themes from the previous film.

The Search for Spock opened on June 1, 1984. In its first week of release, the film grossed STIII-Vulcanover $16 million from almost 2,000 theatres across North America. It went on to gross $76 million at the domestic box office, with a total of $87 million worldwide. Critical reaction to The Search for Spock was positive, but notably less so than the previous film. Reviewers generally praised the cast and characters, while criticism tended to focus on the plot; the special effects were conflictingly received. Roger Ebert called the film a compromise between the tones of the first and second Star Trek films. Nimoy went on to direct The Search for Spock’s sequel, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.

Read more at memory-alpha.wikia.com.

Watch the trailer on the Paramount Movies YouTube Channel.

July 27, 1953 in UK cinemas: Disney’s “Peter Pan”

“WALT DISNEY’s Enchanting Entertainment for EVERYONE!”

Peter Pan is a 1953 American animated fantasy-adventure film produced by Walt Disney and based on the play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up by J.M .Barrie. It is the fourteenth film in the Disney Animated Canon, and was originally released on February 5, 1953 by RKO Radio Pictures. Peter Pan is the final Disney animated feature released through RKO before Walt Disney’s founding of his own distribution company, Buena Vista Distribution, later in 1953 after the film was released. Peter Pan is also the final Disney film in which all nine members of Disney’s Nine Old Men worked together as directing animators. It is also the second Disney animated film starring Kathryn Beaumont, Heather Angel, and Bill Thompson after their roles in the animated feature Alice in Wonderland.

Find out more at disney.wikia.com.

July 27, 1919: Disney’s David Swift is born

David Swift (July 27, 1919 – December 31, 2001) was an American screenwriter, animator, director, and producer.

Swift started out as an animator for Walt Disney Pictures. He worked on such classic animated Disney films as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Pinocchio, Fantasia and Peter Pan.

Swift eventually switched careers from animation to screenwriting and made his directing debut with the Disney film Pollyanna, starring Hayley Mills. After Pollyanna, Swift wrote and directed the film The Parent Trap, again starring Mills.

In the late 1970’s, after a period working for Columbia Pictures, Swift returned to Disney and wrote the screenplay for the Jodie Foster movie Candleshoe.

Find out more at disney.wikia.com and Wikipedia.

July 26, 1969 on UK TV: Star Trek – “The City On The Edge Of Forever”

After taking an accidental overdose of cordrazine, Doctor Leonard McCoy goes back in time and changes history.

TOS-S021E28-City_On_The_Edge_Of_Forever-titleIn orbit around an unexplored planet, the USS Enterprise is on red alert as it passes through violent time distortions surrounding the planet. As the ship plots its orbit, Montgomery Scott warns that the control circuits are threatening to overload. No sooner does Captain Kirk acknowledge the report, the helm console on the bridge explodes and Lieutenant Sulu is injured. Scott takes the helm as Doctor McCoy is called to the bridge for emergency first aid. Scott questions if the ship should break orbit, but Spock advises against it – the ship is literally passing through ripples in time and it is of great scientific importance that they remain and investigate. Kirk agrees and orders Uhura to broadcast to Starfleet Command his past week’s log entries, detailing the unusual readings on the instruments that has diverted the Enterprise to this planet. McCoy arrives and diagnoses Sulu with a heart flutter. He prepares a hypo of cordrazine, warned by Kirk that it is “tricky stuff.” Fortunately, the two drops administered by McCoy successfully revives Sulu.

Scott reports that the Enterprise is nearly clear of the time ripples, which Spock confirms, with one heavy displacement directly ahead. The Enterprise shudders violently as it collides with it, causing Dr. McCoy to slip on the helm console and inject the loaded hypospray into his abdomen, emptying its contents into his bloodstream. Kirk and Spock rush to his aid, but McCoy darts up in a panic. Raving and screaming about “killers” and “assassins”, McCoy breaks free from the concerned bridge crew and flees the bridge via the turbolift. Kirk orders a security alert.

The title of this episode refers to both the dead city on the time planet and New YorkTOS-S021E28-City_On_The_Edge_Of_Forever2 itself, where the timeline will either be restored or disrupted. In Harlan Ellison’s original script, Kirk, upon first seeing the city sparkling like a jewel on a high mountaintop, reverently says it looks like “a city on the edge of forever”. In Ellison’s first treatment for this episode, the city they traveled back in time to was Chicago.

With regards to “The City on the Edge of Forever”, guest star Joan Collins has stated, “To this day, people still want to talk about that episode – some remember me for that more than anything else I’ve done. I am amazed at the enduring popularity of Star Trek and particularly of that episode.” Collins adds, “At the time none of us would have predicted the longevity of the show. I couldn’t be more pleased – or more honored – to be part of TOS-S01E28-City_On_The_Edge_Of_Forever1Star Trek history.” Ms. Collins’ memory of her Trek experience seems hazy, however. In her 1985 autobiography, Past Imperfect (p. 248) she makes a few errors regarding the episode: for example, in addition to the common mistake of referring to Mr. Spock as Dr. Spock, she identifies her character as Edith Cleaver instead of Edith Keeler, and she also claims that Spock, not Kirk, allowed her character to be killed – a plot point that was not in the version of the script that was actually shot. Most significantly, she claims Edith tried to “prove to the world that Hitler was a nice guy.”

Read more at memory-alpha.wikia.com.

Watch the trailer on the TrekCore YouTube Channel.

July 26, 1979 in Doctor Who: “The Image Of Fendahl” novelisation published

“`The Fendahl is death,’ said the the Doctor. `How do you kill death itself?’

The ultra-modern technology of the Time Scanner combines with the ancient evil of Fetch Wood, and brings to life a terror that has lain hidden for twelve million years.

The Doctor and Leela fight to destroy the Fendahl, a recreated menace that threatens to devour all life in the galaxy.”

Doctor Who and the Image of the Fendahl was a novelisation based on the 1977 television serial Image of the Fendahl, written by Terrance Dicks, and published by Target Books in July 1979. The book’s cover (painted by John Geary) was once voted as the worst in the series by readers of Dreamwatch magazine. [Wikipedia]

July 26, 1986 on US TV: Hayley Mills and Hayley Mills in Disney’s “The Parent Trap II”

The Parent Trap II is a 1986 television film. It is a sequel to the Walt Disney Pictures 1961 film, The Parent Trap. It aired on July 26, 1986 on the Disney Channel as a part of its “Sunday Night Movie”. Hayley Mills is the only actor who returned from the original film. She continues to portray Susan and Sharon, the twins who were separated at age one, met up years later at summer camp, switched places, and went on to reunite their divorced parents.

Find out more at disney.wikia.com.

July 26, 1950 in UK cinemas: Disney’s “Cinderella”

“The Greatest Love Story Ever Told!!!”

Cinderella is a 1950 American animated film produced by Walt Disney and is based on the fairy tale “Cinderella” by Charles Perrault. However, “Cinderella stories” can be found in cultures throughout the globe. This is the twelfth feature in the Disney Animated Canon. The film had a limited release on February 15, 1950 by RKO Radio Pictures, before going into general release on March 4. Directing credits go to Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske and Wilfred Jackson. The songs were written by Mack David, Jerry Livingston and Al Hoffman.

Find out more at disney.wikia.com.