July 27, 1984 in UK cinemas: Star Trek III – The Search For Spock

“A Dying Planet. A Fight For Life. The Search For Spock.

“USS Enterprise, captain’s personal log. With most of our battle damage repaired we are almost home. Yet I feel uneasy, and I wonder why… Perhaps it’s the emptiness of this vessel. Most of our trainee crew have been reassigned; Lieutenant Saavik and my son, David, are exploring the Genesis planet, which he helped create; and Enterprise feels like a house with all the children gone. No… more empty even than that. The death of Spock is like an open wound. It seems I have left the noblest part of myself back there on that newborn planet.”

STIII-Kruge

Admiral James T. Kirk, finding out he made a mistake by leaving Spock on the Genesis planet, must disobey orders and hijack the hobbled Enterprise to retrieve his best friend. However, a rogue Klingon seeking the secrets of the “Genesis torpedo” puts Kirk’s mission ā€“ as well as the Enterprise, its crew, and Spock himself ā€“ in jeopardy. [memory-alpha.wikia.com]

STIII-TSFSStar Trek III: The Search for Spock is an American science fiction film directed by Leonard Nimoy and based on the television series of the same name created by Gene Roddenberry. It is the third film in the Star Trek film series, and is the second part of a three-film story arc that begins with Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982) and concludes with Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986). After the death of Spock (Nimoy), the crew of the USS Enterprise returns to Earth. When James T. Kirk (William Shatner) learns that Spock’s spirit, or katra, is held in the mind of Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy (DeForest Kelley), Kirk and company steal the Enterprise to return Spock’s body to his home planet. The crew must also contend with hostile Klingons led by Kruge (Christopher Lloyd) who are bent on stealing the secrets of a powerful terraforming device.

STIII-Destruct

Paramount Pictures commissioned the film after the positive critical and commercial reaction to The Wrath of Khan. Nimoy directed the film, becoming the first Star Trek cast member to do so. Producer Harve Bennett wrote the script starting from the end and working back, and intended the destruction of the Enterprise to be a shocking development. Bennett and Nimoy collaborated with effects house Industrial Light & Magic to develop storyboards and new ship designs; ILM also handled the film’s many special effects sequences. Aside from a single day of location shooting, all of the film’s scenes were shot on Paramount and ILM soundstages. Composer James Horner returned to expand his themes from the previous film.

The Search for Spock opened on June 1, 1984. In its first week of release, the film grossed STIII-Vulcanover $16 million from almost 2,000 theatres across North America. It went on to gross $76 million at the domestic box office, with a total of $87 million worldwide. Critical reaction to The Search for Spock was positive, but notably less so than the previous film. Reviewers generally praised the cast and characters, while criticism tended to focus on the plot; the special effects were conflictingly received. Roger Ebert called the film a compromise between the tones of the first and second Star Trek films. Nimoy went on to direct The Search for Spock’s sequel, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.

Read more at memory-alpha.wikia.com.

Watch the trailer on the Paramount Movies YouTube Channel.

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