May 4, 1959: Sherlock Holmes gets the Hammer treatment

“A SIGHT TO SHATTER THE NERVES! A STORY TO STUN THE SENSES!”

The_Hound_of_the_Baskervilles-1959The Hound of the Baskervilles is a British gothic horror and mystery film, directed by Terence Fisher and produced by Hammer Film Productions. It is based on the novel of the same name by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It stars Peter Cushing as Sherlock Holmes, Sir Christopher Lee as Sir Henry Baskerville and André Morell as Doctor Watson.

It is the first film adaptation of the novel to be filmed in colour. It is one of the most critically acclaimed films in Hammer Film Productions’ history.

The infamous and cruel aristocrat Sir Hugo Baskerville is hosting a party at Baskerville Hall, when the daughter of a cruelly abused servant escapes from the mansion through a window, frightened by Baskerville’s lustful intent for her. Baskerville pursues her through the moor with a pack of beagles. The beagles and Baskerville’s horse are spooked and back off. Baskerville dismounts and pursues her on foot, finds her and stabs her to death with a curved dagger in the nearby abbey ruins. Suddenly, a dog unseen but heard by the audience appears and kills Baskerville. From then on, as legend has it, the “Hound of Hell” has become known as the “Hound of the Baskervilles”, and any night a Baskerville is alone on the moor, the hound will kill him.

Cinema-UK-05-04-1959

Cushing would later reprise the role in the BBC Sherlock Holmes television series nine years later, filming sixteen episodes, two of which were a new interpretation of The Hound of the Baskervilles, this time with Nigel Stock as Watson. Cushing was an aficionado of Sherlock Holmes and brought his knowledge to the project. It was Cushing’s suggestion that the mantlepiece feature Holmes’ correspondence transfixed to it with a jackknife as per the original stories. [Wikipedia]

Watch the trailer on the Blazing Trailers YouTube Channel.

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